Tag Archives: trees

Rain, rain, rain!

Saturday 9 November 2019

It was pouring with rain but I thought that might give the trees in the woodland more of a sheen, so I returned to Stenshuvuds National Park and with waterproofs on I set off into the wood.

I climbed to the top of a small hill in the nature reserve and saw that the mist was moving into the wood, off the sea. It was just what I wanted. I’m not good at woodland photography, so I found it very difficult to find compositions but took the opportunity to try the tips I had gained from watching all those Simon Baxter videos. I did get two or three images I am really pleased with. I hope you like them.

But the rain has to stop sometime and this evening I just got a few brief moments on the beach at Stenshuvuds when the rain stopped and the setting sun made an appearance and changed the light dramatically.

Stenshuvuds beach at sunset

It was well worth trudging through the rain soaked forest and I went to another National Park to find a place to wild camp, Sandhammaren. Again this was almost on the beach and was nice and quiet at this time of year.

When the weather plays ball this is paradise!

Monday 28 October 2019

Yesterday I found myself on a high road in the mountains with the snow beginning to settle on the road and the driving conditions becoming steadily worse. I certainly didn’t want to wild camp in those conditions with the risk that I wouldn’t be able to move in the morning, so I made my way to lower ground. Today the weather was completely different, with clear blue skies and the promise of it continuing throughout the day.

I’d found a campsite in a very small village called Røldal situated right on the edge of Røldalsvatnet lake and surrounded by high mountains. The facilities were excellent and it was run by a very friendly and welcoming farmer’s wife who turned out to be from Sweden and had moved to Norway many years before and brought up five children on this farm.

Røldal campsite

I set off early to explore the surrounding area and I was stunned by it’s beauty. It was the kind of landscape I love, with high mountains, huge lakes and enormous forests. I travelled around the area, known as Røgaland and made many, many photographs. I must say that when confronted by magnificent landscape like this, I do feel somewhat overwhelmed and find it difficult to capture anything resembling a true representation of it with the camera, but I’m here to try and do that, so I’ll keep trying.

See how the light captures the shapes and intricacies of these wintering birch trees, now devoid of all their leaves.
Mokleivåsen beside lake Røldalsvatnet
Lake Røldalsvatnet

I discovered a preserved farmhouse and outbuildings that was apparently typical of the ‘cotter’ or crofter farms of the 18th and 19th century in this area. Built in 1834, the farm had been occupied by the Røynevarden family until 1948 and was now in the care of a Norwegian organisation that strives to preserve the heritage of the area.

Røynevarden farm, note the grass rooves of the house and buildings.

I spent the day driving around the area and decided to return to the same campsite that evening.

Oslo and the Vigeland Sculpture Park

Monday 21 October2019

Oslo’s Vigeland Park, is the largest sculpture park in the world by a single artist, boasting over 200 pieces by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland

This sculpture park in the Frogner Park, Oslo with more than 200 sculptures by Gustav Vigeland (1869–1943) in bronze, granite and cast iron, including The Angry Boy (Sinnataggen in Norwegian), The Monolith (Monolitten) and The Wheel of Life (Livshjulet) really is a must visit place if you’re in the Norwaegian capital.

Vigeland was also responsible for the design and architectural outline of the park, which is one of Norway’s top tourist attractions, with more than one million annual visitors.

I spent a good half day there and became completely immersed in viewing the sculptures, all of which are life like and of people varying in age from newly born to near death. It is exquisite and my camera was constantly clicking, trying to capture the beauty and the expressions on the faces of the subjects in various materials.

Just to add to the overall gorgeousness (is that actually a word??) of the place, the trees were in full autumn colour and looked fabulous.

As the light began to fade it was time to leave and make my way out of the city. Oslo is a vibrant and busy city and I promised myself I would return when the opportunity arose, there is so much more to see.

One thing I must mention here, is the fact that Oslo is full of Tesla, and other electric vehicles. Having rarely seen a Tesla before, I was struck by how many there were. One can understand why when you see that all the bus/taxi only lanes are full of them, whilst we drivers of the great polluters queue to move a few yards. This is also something I’ve noticed in the rest of Norway, electric vehicles are everywhere and the recharge network is in evidence from the far north to the capital city. I feel it is something we should seriously try to address in the UK.

Just one Tesla amongst 15 I counted in this small car park at Frogner Park

There is also a scheme too borrow these scooters to get you around the city.

A great day in Norway’s capital!

A Sunday Drive on the E7

Sunday 20 October 2019

I left the excellent campsite at Geilo and took to the E7 route heading south. The trees were just stunning in their autumn colours that seem to get more saturated as each day passes. Near a place called Nes in Buskerund Kommune I came to Lake Hallingdalselva where the reflection of the wooded area opposite was just exquisite. Once again I saw a house that seemed to have been built in just an ideal location. The whole scene just had to be photographed.

The silver birch trees above made a really good tryptic I thought (I may swap them around when I get round to printing them!)

What a location this house is in and the perfectly still water reflected it beautifully.
The mist floating over the top of the mountain here just made it for me.