Tag Archives: far north

Myre, Langøya island

Saturday 14 September 2019,

(Most of this post written by FIONA Illingworth, whilst enjoying her well deserved holiday with me here in Norway)

9.50 am

The site of our wild camp last night was stunning. There were three vans parked up overnight. A couple of Norwegians next to us, must have been easily in their 60’s, were out under their awning almost all night, the bloke feeding a small wooden fire whilst his wife read the newspaper. Completely mad! Having said that, the weather looked and sounded far more foreboding from inside the van than it actually proved to be when we went out ourselves to take some video and stills. The start of the sunset was beautiful but then low cloud on the horizon deprived us of a final peek at the sun going down behind the waves. It was magical to be out watching it unfold.

Sunset on the beach near Nøss

The sun is shining this morning and we are heading across to Langøya to camp at Myre, which is on the outer side and facing Prestfjorden out to the north west. The campsite has good reviews and is somewhere new. John suggested the campsite at Bleik but I fancied a change of scenery.

It is good that the sun is out; it brings out the fabulous autumn colours. There are so many shades of green, yellow and red. The leaves are slowly turning and I’m sad to say that I think I will miss the best of it. John is in search of a single yellow or red tree against the green backdrop of other trees but we haven’t found one. All the trees are turning around the same time so there are few lone trees standing out from the crowd.

7.45 pm

We had a wonderful drive through fabulous autumn colours from our wild camp just outside Nøss in Andøy to Myre. We have had mixed weather this afternoon … rain showers followed by sunny spells, with plenty of rainbows. I have never seen so many rainbows in such a short space of time. I am glad we gave the Versterålens more of a chance.

Yet another glorious rainbow!

I think we were both tempted to give up on them yesterday as the landscape, though beautiful, appeared nothing like as breathtaking as the Lofotens. But, actually, though it is a gentler landscape, it is truly beautiful. Today we were blown away by the autumn colours, reflected well during the bright sunny periods. We could easily have been in the Trossachs or the Canadian Rockies.

The sea on the outer side of the islands can get quite rough and we watched some significant waves crashing against the rocks in Andøya first thing. When the sun is out it looks lovely but there is a cold breeze. I managed to go out for a run in Myre this afternoon. It started to rain just as I planned to go, but I waited half an hour and, lo and behold, the sun came out again. I found I could run along very quiet roads the whole time and just saw a glimpse of Myre before I turned back. Apparently, Myre is a modern fishing village and its port is one of the world’s biggest exporters of seafood. I saw a large factory out of town, presumably where all the seafood is processed, but other than that there was nothing to suggest this accolade!

The campsite here is excellent. After my run, I had a brilliant shower and had to turn it down a bit as the pressure was so strong! This evening I have cooked meatballs in the kitchen: all mod cons and very clean. It is good to be able to save on the gas in the van. I worry that John will run out and he cannot buy more cooking gas in Norway as they don’t sell it here (because it freezes in the winter).

Our view on the campsite at Myre, Andøya
A dramatic sky over the distant hills this evening

I have managed to persuade John to attempt The Queen’s Route tomorrow. This is a 15km circular walk along a marked trail. It is classed as a hard route mostly due to some steep sections I think. It is called the Queen’s Route because HM Queen Sonja walked this route in 1992. In 2015 it was voted amongst the top 10 most spectacular hikes in Norway. It is just up the road. How can we not give it a go? I am sure we will both be fine with it. The route is between two fishing villages, Stø to the north and Nyksund slightly further south. On one leg of the trip you follow a coastal path and on the other you follow a mountain path. Sounds awesome and I can’t wait. The walk is said to take between 5-8 hours. Knowing us, stopping every hundred metres or so to take photos, it’ll probably be the 8 hours!

Arctic Anniversary

Friday 13 September 2019

Today is our 22nd wedding anniversary!

(Most of this post written by FIONA Illingworth, whilst enjoying her well deserved holiday with me here in Norway)

9.45 am

In the bakery at Andenes. This building had housed a bakery since 1912. It appears to be the hub of this small town, as we have seen in so many other places. People come here and have coffee, eat a huge sandwich or a pastry and catch up with friends. It all seems very civilised. They are calm and quiet places. Bread and cakes are an important part of Norwegian culture from what we can gather. Each place has its own version of cinnamon bread for a start. There is a lot of choice of other cakes, but cinnamon bread appears the staple. The people here are solid, heftily built but not fat – no wonder with all the bread and cake they eat, combined with their love of the outdoors.

Bårds Bakeri, Andenes

11.45 am

We had a walk around Andenes. There is much new building going on – a new hotel opening next year and work is ongoing in a new visitor centre at the Aurora Space Centre.

Aurora Space Centre

But much of it seems down at heel. We have seen more houses empty and/or with peeling paint today than before. We have been wondering what work is available for the locals. Once you have accounted for the emergency services and other public sector, the army, the fish farms and tourist trade … what else is here? The surrounding areas beyond town are made up of farms … mostly small family farms, so I expect they will offer limited work opportunities.

I suspect we are not seeing the place at its best. The tourist season ended on 1 September, so many things (such as some of the restaurants and galleries) are closed now for the winter. But I have to be honest, even so, Vesterålen does not appear nearly as impressive as its big brother, Lofoten.

Sunset at Nøss …

We are in a small carpark not far up the road from Nøss, a spot that John discovered on a phone app he has used a lot on this trip, (Camper Contact) which details lots of sites, paid and unpaid. We tried another one earlier on, where we had a go at cleaning the solar panel on the roof as the leisure battery has flattened on us a couple of times recently. It has to be said that we are charging a lot of batteries and devices and the sun hasn’t made much of an appearance lately. The car park was fine but there wasn’t much of a view so we decided to move. I am glad we did because here we can look straight out to sea and there is a beach where we went to do a piece to camera. Fiona wore a Norwegian hat, in which she looked completely ridiculous. She tried to write the dates of our wedding anniversary in the sand, but didn’t do a very good job. She needed a long stick to avoid messing up the sand with footprints. Hindsight is a wonderful thing!

Beach near Nøss
Sunset at Nøss

More information about Skulpturlandskap Nordland (Artscape Nordland)

I picked up a brochure in the tourist information office today that provides a lot more information about the sculptures we have seen dotted about Lofoten. This is a county wide initiative, inviting international artists to take part from19 countries, including Norwegian artists (so not as first thought). Nordland is a province of Norway. From the name, you’d think it was the northernmost part of Norway, but in fact it forms the middle section. There are 36 sculptures all together, two of them are by English artists: Anthony Gormley and Tony Cragg. We won’t get to see either of their artworks as they are in places we don’t have time to visit. There are 5 artworks on Vesterålen and I am particulary keen to see one by a Norwegian artist called Kjell Erik Killi Olsen. His piece is at Bø, in the south western part of the islands, and is titled The Man from the Sea. Perhaps we will do that tomorrow.

There are 5 art pieces on the Lofotens and we managed to see 3 of them – not bad going!

The idea of the project is to reflect the fact that the landscape shows traces of struggles through time. Each piece is designed to take up its own place in the landscape and to create a new dimension in the landscape. Some of the ones we saw worked really well; others spoke less to me but perhaps they will appeal to others.

It’s raining……again!

Sunday 25 August 2019

The rain continues to pour down so I drove from Ersfjord a couple of kms and parked up in a quiet spot by a small pier where a couple of locals were fishing.

Ersfjord in the rain

I stayed there most of the day and did some writing and picture editing.

I returned to Ersfjord for the night.

Ersfjord bay
At least it has a good loo!!
….and a very impressive backdrop.